Breaks / Leaks


Water Main Breaks

If you suspect a water main break please call the Village. You can report a break 24 hours a day, seven days a week, including holidays by calling (630) 897-8228 ext. 223 during business hours or (630) 897-8705 after hours and holidays.

Water bubbling up through the pavement or just running down the street may indicate signs of a broken water main. Water main breaks may leave affected areas without water service during the repair. Many factors will affect the duration of service outages for repair. Among these factors are size of the water main which sustained the rupture, and the allocated time required to locate and mark utilities. The Village will make every attempt to notify those affected by the water service interruption beforehand and provide an estimated time of completed repair.

The Water Department would rather receive multiple reports about a suspected leak or water main break than no calls at all. Don't assume that someone else will make the call; we need to save every drop of water we can.

Water Leaks

Leaks are responsible for about 14 percent of wasted water. Sometimes you may have a leak and not even know it. The best indication will be a higher bill compared to past use.
Slow drips of water can add up quickly. A toilet that “keeps running” after you flush or a sink that drips after it is turned off can waste thousands of gallons of water a year.

Toilet leaks can range from small to large, constant or random. Many are even silent. Even a small, silent leak can easily waste $50 per month in water and sewer costs. Large leaks can waste much more. Fortunately, most toilet leaks are relatively easy to fix. In a properly functioning toilet, no water should move from the tank to the bowl, unless the toilet is being flushed. A leaking toilet loses water from the tank to the bowl without being flushed. If you do have a leak, there are a number of possible causes. If you remove the tank lid and can easily identify the cause, correct the problem and try your leak test again. Consider that “fixes” such as bending the float back to shape, or adjusting how the rubber flapper falls, often end up failing soon afterward. In most cases, you will simply want to replace the toilet flapper (the rubber thing at the bottom of the tank that keeps water in the tank) and/or the filling mechanism. These are available at hardware stores and home centers for about $8 each.

A leaking faucet is frequently the result of a bad rubber washer. The washer on a sink is typically located under the handle. A washer is relatively easy to replace, if you have the right tools. It does require shutting off the water under the faucet, and removing the handle. Check local home centers or the Internet (keywords “repairing leaky faucets”) for instructions on how to repair faucet leaks. If you don’t feel comfortable doing the repair yourself, a plumber may be your best option. Remember, even if you have to pay a plumber to fix the leak, you will end up saving money in the long run.

If the drip is hot water, you are paying for wasted energy too. Fix leaks as soon as you find them. They won’t go away on their own and often become worse over time.

In the event a break or leak develops in the water meter itself or the water service pipe located between the center of the stop box and the water main the North Aurora Water Department is responsible for the repair. The customer shall be responsible for the repair of any leaks in the service line between the center of the stop box and the water meter location. In addition, the customer and /or property owner is responsible for the service line behind the meter and the property’s plumbing.